Lipinski Joins Medisyn’s Blue-Chip Scientific Advisory Board to Focus on High Profile Applications for Medisyn’s Forward EngineeringTM Technology Platform


MINNEAPOLIS, MN, May 18, 2006 - Medisyn Technologies, Inc. said today that Dr. Christopher Lipinski—the world-renowned scientist and author of the pharmaceutical industry standard “Rule of Five” analysis—will join the Company as a Scientific Advisor and Consultant. 

Dr. Lipinski, who retired recently as Senior Research Fellow at Pfizer Global R&D, has been honored by the American Chemical Society for his groundbreaking “Rule of Five” analysis. Since its publication in 1997, Lipinski’s “Rule of Five” has emerged as a critical filter for drug development programs by helping to raise awareness about properties and structural features that make molecules more or less drug-like. A simple algorithm that helps to identify successful drug candidates, the “Rule-of-Five” is widely accepted within scientific circles as a landmark contribution to drug development. 

Currently, Dr. Lipinski serves as a scientific advisor to the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development, Melior Discovery, and the Matrical Company and is a consultant for the Hereditary Disease Foundation. He also is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and a winner of numerous scientific awards and professional citations. 

According to Medisyn’s president, David Land, “Since our first meeting, Chris has expressed a strong interest in Medisyn’s technology and its potential to significantly improve drug discovery,” Land said. “Our Board of Directors is delighted that Chris has agreed to work with Medisyn on specific projects that will showcase the exceptional capabilities of Medisyn’s Forward Engineering platform,” Land added. 

There is a significant, unmet need for new drug lead candidates in the pharmaceutical industry. Currently, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are battling patent expirations and are struggling to improve drug development productivity which today is a costly and time-consuming process with no guaranteed success. Dr. Lipinski said he sees Medisyn’s technology as potentially providing significant unrealized value to medicinal chemistry in very important but historically challenging tasks such as the choice of the best chemical series for optimization against difficult targets. "I really hope that I can assist Medisyn in developing the retrospective "killer case histories" for the value of this technology in solving the historically very difficult medicinal chemistryproblems posed by many of the really biologically exciting but chemically difficult new drug targets".